Stock Up On Evergreen Content

When it comes to Twitter, you’ve got to give people a reason to follow you.  Unless you’re a celebrity or really, really ridiculously good looking, people aren’t going to follow you “just because” (or at least, they won’t stay your follower).

People want content.  In fact, that’s why most good marketers will tell you that “content is king”.

What exactly that content is varies depending on your target audience, but there’s 4 things that every audience wants your content to be:

  1. Consistent – They’re favorite people on Twitter are the people who post consistently good content.  If half of your tweets are mediocre, most people aren’t going to sift through the crap to find the gold.
  2. Frequent – Twitter is not designed for the occasional once-a-week or whenever-you-remember-to-post-something tweet. Twitter is too fast-paced for that. What you posted an hour ago is probably already forgotten (unless it’s been making it’s way around via retweets, see number 3). So you need to post frequently – the more the better – so you can stay in front of your audience.
  3. Shareable – People like following people that post content that they can retweet (which is great for you, but we’ll get into that in a later post). Maybe it’s judgmental for me to say, but most people on social media (especially Twitter) want their followers to think they have more intelligence, creativity, influence, humor or relevance than they actually do.  Which means, they seek out and follow people that they can retweet and look smarter, more creative, funnier, or more influential.
  4. Relevant – We all like to consume content that is relevant to us: stuff we like, tips to get better at our job, things about people like us, viewpoints that are congruent with our own, topics that we want to know about, hobbies we spend time doing, etc.  For example: I think golf is boring, so I’m not likely to follow many pro-golfers unless they regularly tweet about technology, entrepreneurship, or other things I find interesting – which is fine, because I am not their target audience.  The more you know about your audience, the easier it is to get this right.

Don’t Wait Till Their Starving

If you invite people over for a dinner party, you probably should go out and buy the food (and start cooking it) before the guests start showing up.  Why?  Because people come to your dinner party expecting food – if there’s no food, there’s a good chance they’ll leave or at least complain a lot.

The same goes for Twitter.  Don’t start trying to get more people to follow you if you don’t have any content ready for them.  Start off by stocking up on a bunch of content.  Evergreen content.

Evergreen content is content that’s always good – whether you post it now or 6 months or 2 years from now.  The nice folks over at Buffer dive into more details about what evergreen content is (they’re focus is on evergreen blog posts, but most of their tips and ideas still apply).

Fill Up The Pantry

I’m spending the first phase of my Social Media Double Up Challenge filling up my pantry (or library) with a bunch of evergreen content.  This won’t be the only content I’ll be tweeting, but I’ll be stocking up with enough to tweets to know that there’s ALWAYS content being posted even if I don’t get time to queue up content for that day.

I’m using Edgar to do this.

Edgar lets you store a bunch of tweets (as well as Facebook and LinkedIn posts) in your library.  There’s a bunch of other platforms let you do that as well, but here’s what sets Edgar apart:

  1. Categories – Edgar lets you categorize each of your posts based on the content or type.
  2. Scheduling Done Right – Similar to Buffer, you set specific post times for each day of the week and at those times it posts a tweet from your library (no more scheduling each individual post).
  3. Category Based Schedules – Edgar goes a step further than Buffer by letting you pick which category or categories it should pull the tweet from for each posting time.  Meaning you can have it always post an article, then a video, then a question, then a self-promoting post, then an inspirational quote, etc.  Important because no one wants to get 5 promotional posts from you in a row.
  4. Evergreen – Tweets are gone quickly.  They’re shelf-life is very short.  The people over at Wisemetrics define the “engagement half-life” of a tweet with at least 10 retweets as being only 24 minutes (that means that your tweets have a half-life that is 1 billion times shorter than Carbon-14′s).  So if people aren’t on Twitter within a few hours of you posting that epic tweet you’re so very proud of, they’ll probably never see it.  Unless you’re using Edgar.  Edgar stores of your tweets in your library, and once you’ve posted everything in your library, it’ll start reposting your content.  Don’t worry, if you fill up your library with great content, no one will notice the “repeats” – and if they do, they won’t care!

(A note about “repeat content”: That idea turns a lot of people off.  But realize this, if you a) spend a couple afternoons curating 100 links to blog articles, 100 great quotes, 100 engaging questions, and 100 hilarious YouTube videos; then b) set Edgar to send out two tweets a day – you’ll have over 6 months of content being posted before anything repeats.  And really, do you even remember what people posted on Twitter 6 days ago let alone 6 months ago?)

 

Remember, your evergreen content shouldn’t be the ONLY content you post to Twitter, but its your GUARANTEED content – ensuring your posting at least a couple times a day (even if you don’t even think about Twitter the whole week)!